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Full text of ""The Crescent" Student Newspaper: 1922-24"

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George Fox Ccffegt 



THE CRESCENT 



VOLUME XXXV 



NEWBERG, OREGON. FEBRUARY 20, 1924 



NUMBER 7 



J 



NAVYBLUE DEFEAT OLD PACIflc l0SES SEC0ND G *» E 
GOLD IN FUND CONTEST 



College Teams Respord to Chal- 
lenge With Surprising Results 



Enthusiasm mixed with a liberal 
portion of real excitement has been 
running high at Pacific College dur- 
ing the past week. The occasion 
was a check for one hundred dollars 
sent by a friend of the college, who 
will send a like amount as often as 
the students duplicate it, until the 
sum has reached $1000, to be used 
as a Stundent Loan Fund. 

Dividing the college and academy 
students and faculties into two 
teams, the "Old Gold" and "Navy 
Blue" representing the college col- 
ors, the two factions set to work 
with an energy that foretold splen- 
did results. Miss Helen Robertson 
leads the glittering array of "Old 
Gold" forces, while Miss Mary El- 
liott is the able captain of the "Navy 
Blue." Over all is the able direc- 
tion of Miss Florence Lee. who is 
likened to a famous generalissimo in 
her strategic operations. 

The enthusiasm has been main- 
tained by a closely contested fight 
for supremacy since the campaign 
started. The "Navy Blue" jumped 
into the lead less than three hours 
after the start, winning the prize 
offered for the first $50 dollars 
raised. This lead, though- of nar- 
row margin, has been maintained 
steadily throughout the week. Only 
twice have the "Blues" reflected the 
spirit of their color, once when the 
"Old Gold" were reported in the 
lead with funds, and again when 
the "Old Gold" proved superior in 
athletics. 

Various devices have been used 
for raising funds. The "Old Gold" 
beat the "Navy Blue" to the public 
by selling tags at ten cents each, 
which stated the purpose of the 
drive. A peanut sale after the ly- 
ceum number Thursday evening 
gave the "Old Gold" more cash. Two 
basketball games between the color- 
ful rivals, one between the men, the 
other between the women, produced 
the high tide of excitement. The 
men's game was played on Tuesday 
evening, and in the first half looked 
like an easy victory for the "Blues." 
But in the second half the "Old 
Gold" came back with a horseshoe 
up each sleeve, and scattered indigo 
all over the gym. 

The "Navy Blue" girls turned the 
tables Wednesday evening, and won 
an easy victory over the husky but 
slow team of "Old Gold." 

A very clever idea was carried out 
on Friday afternoon by the "Navy 
Blue" when several boys and girls, 
dressed in various costumes and dis- 
guises, apPerared on First street 
with forty homemade pies which 
were sold on the street, and in the 
stores, either one pie at a time or 
piece at a time. This netted the 
"Navy Blues" nearly $17, making 
their quota well over $100. The 
"Old Gold" are now near $90 dol- 
lars, so that the efforts of one weeks 
work have produced remarkable re- 
sults through the initiative of the 
students. The campaign will be con- 



ON LINFIELD COLLEGE FLOOR 



Pacific College basketball squad 
suffered defeat Friday, February 15, 
at the hands of their hereditary en- 
emy, Linfield College, in Linfield's 
gym, by the score of 38-13. 

First Half 

Linfield Ftarted scoring early and 
dropped in a field goal and two foul 
throws immediately.. Pacific start- 
ed some scoring also and Woodward 
and Brown each took a field counter 
thus tieing the score. 

Linfield caged a foul throw, and 
Woodward did likewise for Pacific 
and the score was again tied. 

Linfield warmed up and dropped 
in three fast ones. Pacific took their 
first time out in an effort to get a 
hold on the game. But Linfield was 
eager and chalked up two more in 
quick succession. 

Lienard forfeited his free foul 
throw by stepping over the line. 

Linfield took the ball to their end 
of the floor and the P. C. boys start- 
ed fighting and showed some really 
snappy defensive work, but Linfield 
finally scored, and followed it quick- 
ly with another. 

Woodward converted a foul throw 
into a two point and a beautiful 
long side shot and Pacific looked up, 
but Linfield took the ball in an 
open fumble and stored away two 
more points, which Miller followed 
with a clean shot from center. 

Rinard started a dribble in the 
enemy's zone and planted two points 
for Paficic. 

Second Half 

Linfield started the game with a 
bang and scored two in the first 
few seconds. 

Both teams checked up closely 
and only long shots were possible, 
but none connected. 

Linfield finally scored after a 
sharp tussle in which Pacific tried 
desperately to turn the tide. 

Pacific failed to check quick 
enough on Linfield's out and Wil- 
son dribbled in for an easy basket. 
Kratt took a long pass and chalked 
up another. 

Pacific took the fourth time out 
and Linfield scored the penalty foul. 

Rinard caged a neat one, but Mil- 
ler came back and rolled in another 
counter for Linfield. 

The P. C. boys appeared a slight 
bit lost on Linfield's wide floor, and 
didn't seem sure of their plays, but 
they fought desperately to stop Lin- 
field's scoring machine. 

Referee — Don Craw. 

Lineups: 

| P. C. 13 Linfield 38 

I Rinard, 4 F 7, Wakeman 

Woodward, 7 F 12, Miller 

I Lienard C 14, Wilson 

I Brown, 2 G Hoberg 

Armstrong G 4, Kratt 

Sanders F Pugh 

F Loree 
G Konzelman 
G Gower 
G Manning 



tinued for some days, but the great- 
er proportion of the activity will be 
confined to alumni, and to the pub- 
lic which has not yet been ap- 
proached. 



STUDENTS HOLD GOOD SOCIAL , 
MIXER OF GAMES AND STUNTS! 



After the student mix Saturday 
night most of the Student Body 1 
wished they had been brought up 
with an occasional "thee" and 
"thou" in their conversation. "Doc" 
Crozer won the big "beetle bug" for 
catching the most people off their 
guard and thus securing the most 
toothpicks. Although everyone had 
ten toothpicks when the game be- 
gan, some found themselves with 
none when the time was up. 

Sixteen couples were chosen from 
the crowd and lined up for a relay 
race, with eight couples on each 
side. As the old saying is, "the 
first shall be last" and so on, the 
side that was quickest to start was 
last to finish. Once the folding 
chair nearly collapsed, another time 
two heads bumped, and as Miss Lee 
said afterwards, "Oh, was that the 
noise?" But everyone had a good 
time. 

•Miss Lee proved her ability as a 
general in the game of spelling, 
leading her side to victory seven 
times against the four times for the 
other side. 

After the games the stunts were 
given in the chapel. The first prize 
went to the first and second year 
classes for having the best stunt of 
all. Each member of the Academy 
faculty was impersonated in cos- 
tume and the stunt closed with a 
faculty meeting which was interrup- 
ted by the return of "The Fisher- 
man" with many tales of fish. 

The Freshmen and Sophomores 
received the second prize, giving 
"The Downfall of Brutus." The 
story was exceedingly vivid and for 
the first time in our lives we literal- 
ly saw the long hours pass, the 
shadows gather, and many other 
strange things. The third prize was 
given to the third and fourth years 
who worked out in shadow pictures 
"Wild Nell." An English princess 
was captured and bound to a stake 
by the Indians, but the bold, brave 
cowpuncher, with the aid of Wild 
Nell, rescued her in the nick of 
time. Whereupon Wild Nell, hav- 1 
ing done her duty for the lover, 
stabbed herself. 

The Juniors and Seniors gave us 
a peek into their family album. 
Among their relatives were some of 
the members of the faculty. The 
names of many were very familiar 
to us, but the faces seemed to have 
changed strangely during the pass- 
ing years. 

The Commercial students showed 
us a remarkable new invention, call- 
ed the "writeoscope" of the Johnson 
make, model I. Its real ability in 
taking dictation and interpreting it 
was demonstrated. We believe the 
invention will soon be included in 
every well equipped office. 

But of all the stunts if one takes 
the judgment of the audience was 
the one given by the faculty. Their 
men's quartet dressed like dagos ap- 
peared "working on the railroad" 
with that well known old song that 
begins "Patsi-uri-iri-a." 

The prizes received were very 
sweet and appreciated by those who 
received them. Following the 



(Continued on page four) 



"BOYS WILL BE BOYS" 
IS EXCELLENT LECTURE 

Captain Upton Tells Audience How 
to Handle Boys 



Another number of the local Iy- 
ceum course was thoroughly enjoyed 
by the people of Newberg on the 
evening of February 14, when Cap- 
tain T. Dinsmore Upton s;oke in the 
college auditorium. Captain Upton 
chose for his lecture the subjects 
"Boys Will Be Boys" and "The 
Guards in the Game." He illustrat- 
ed his lecture by relating many 
stories and personal incidents, 
some sad and some humorous, but 
each one emphasizing some phase of 
the subject. 

Mr. Upton said that many people 
call life a battle, but that anyone 
who saw service in the Great War 
will realize that this is not true. 
Life is not a battle, but a game. 
God sent us into the world to play 
the game of life. Man did not play 
fair, so He sent in the Perfect Play- 
er. Even though some must play in 
the shadow, as the guards play in 
the game, each should play so that 
the other may know how he can and 
always will play. Make others love 
you for the strength of your charac- 
ter. 

"Stumbling Blocks," said Mr. Up- 
ton, "is only a coward's excuse." 
He then went on to say that these 
stumbling blocks make parts of the 
stairway by which we should climb, 
and these same stumbling blocks 
can often be made into stepping 
stones to success. Success or a life 
worth while is not a question of 
years, but is how we play for others 
and how much we scatter little 
things to make others happy. 

In talking about boys, Captain 
Upton first spoke about the loyalty 
of boys — so strong in some as to 
cause them to invent things in order 
to tell the gang "What Dad Did." 
This loyalty on the part of the child 
increases the responsibility of par- 
enthood, and demands that the par- 
ents give something out of their 
own lives to that child — that "some- 
thing" which cannot be obtained 
from any other source. The child 
reflects the character of the home 
and the family receives the credit. 

Three things, according to Cap- 
tain Upton, should be taught child- 
ren. Each child should be taught 
the love of God, love of home, and 
love of country. Each one should 
take more' interest in children, for 
a soul is always worth while. This 
interest may be made effective by 
starting something in the town, by 
starting something definite as indi- 
viduals, and by making the home 
atractive. 

He next spoke of the crime crises 
in America and that methods of pre- 
vention should be taken. To do this 
the young boys and girls must be 
reached and influenced. He said 
that perhaps; one of the worst things 
about our industrial schools is that 
nobody really cares for the individ- 
uals in these schools, and that some 
are simply there because there is no 



(Continued on page two) 



THE CRESCENT 



Entered aa second-class mail matter 
at Postofflce at Newberg, Ore. 

Published Semi-Monthly during 
the college year by the Student 
Body of Pacific College, Newberg, 
Oregon. 

Ben Darling Editor-in-Chief 

Iris Hewitt Associate Editor 

Florence Lee Society Editor 

John Chenevert Sports Editor 

Ralph Hester Business Manager 

Ivor Jones Circulation Manager 

REPORTERS 

Helen Hester, Marie Hester, Hulda 
Winslow, Rose Ellen Hale, Phillip 
Haworth, Edna Christie, Elsie Allen, 
Royal Gettman, Edith Sanderman and 
Lucille Clough. 



Terms: $1.00 the Tear in Advance. 
Single Copy 10c. 

ACTIVITY THAT PAYS 

The healthiest activity that has 
come to Pacific College students for 
a*, long time is the raising of the 
..Student Loan Fund, that is now go- 
ing on. The Student Loan Fund 
marks another step forward for Pa- 
cific, and indicates clearly the qual- 
ity of the student body at this insti- 
tution. It is hardly possible that 
any" student who is now in the col- 
lege hopes to benefit from the fund, 
but the appeal to service for future 
students is a powerful magnet. Let 
the good work go on, this is real 
construction. 



TREFIAN 

Trefian met on Thursday instead 
of Wednesday, the usual day of 
meeting. Much to the sorrow of 
the college girls, there was in the 
form of business a new proposition 
that a new society should be formed 
by the Academy girls and teachers 
separate from the old society. This 
action was discussed and finally put 
in the hands of a committee to de- 
cide definitely. The main program 
then began. Eva Miles accompanied 
' by Hilma Hendrickson sang a beau- 
. tiful selection from Lizah Legman's 
"Persian Garden." The past work of 
, the society was reviewed by Lucille 
Clough, followed by a farewell ad- 
dress from Dilla Tucker, the former 
president. The new officers were 
then installed and Florence Lee, the 
new president gave her inaugural 
address in which she mentioned her 
intention of using Roberts Rules of 
Order more extensively. Mary El- 
liott gave a prospective view of the 
future for the society which was 
very encouraging. Last but not least 
an interesting piano solo was given 
by Mrs. Michener which was thor- 
oughly enjoyed by her audience. 
The critic's report was given and 
the meeting adjourned. 



WE'LL TO AGAIN 

Pacific College isn't a serious con- 
tender for the championship in bas- 
ketball this year, but that doesn't 
say we aren't going to be next year 
or the next, and so on. With only 
one letter man on the team, even if 
he happens to be one of the best 
guards in the game and the rest of 
the team made up of green material, 
there isn't much chance to win from 
the teams composed of letter men 
from the years before. A team, or a 
group of rooters need not be whip- 
ped, simply because they haven't 
piled up the most points. It's how 
game you are, that counts. Back in 
1917, Pacific College won decisively 
the championship in this conference, 
and then again in 1920-21 tied for 
it again. So, while we are trailing 
afar off this year, our chance is con> 
ing again. 



THE PENNINGTONS ENTERTAIN 

On Thursday evening, February 
14, President and Mrs. Pennington 
entertained at dinner. Covers were 
laid at four daintily appointed ta- 
bles for Captain T. Dinsmore Upton, 
Miss Lewis, the Juniors, the Seniors, 
and the host and hostess. Soft can- 
dle light on the tables and a cheery, 
snapping fire made the rooms seem 
very attractive. The rooms were 
hung with red cupids and there 
were several baskets of exceptionally 
beautiful pussywillows. Each guest 
found his place by drawing a num- 
bered heart, and then seeking the 
correspondingly numbered place 
card valentine. A charming menu 
was arranged featuring the heart 
motif throughout. Assisting about 
the rooms were Helen Nordyke and 
Olive Terrelll, daintily dressed aB a 
reminder of the day. After a very 
pleasant dinner hour, the party gave 
place to Captain Upton's lecture. 

PROP. NEWLIN SPOKE 

ON WORLD PEACE 



THE COMING ELECTIONS 

■ The student elections are only two 
weeks off. The choosing of our. offi- 
cers is a vital matter. The best 
qualified person should be placed in 
the office where he is needed most. 
Personal ambitions and politics 
must not dictate the election. Any 
cliques should be discouraged. Not 
that there is any, do we think for a 
minute, but we don't want any, 
either. There is a big program 
ahead for us; let us choose wisely, 
distribute the tasks evenly, and then 
get behind our leaders in a solidly 
united body. 



On February 15, Mr. Newlin, pro- 
, fessor of history and political sci- 
' once, spoke about the wars of the 
past and the plans for world peace 
which have followed each of these 
great struggles, especially those 
which followed the conflicts of 
1600, 1700, 1800 and 1900. Some of 
those mentioned were "The Grand 
Design" by Henry IV of France, the 
"Essay on Eternal Peace," publish- 
ied in 1795, the work of the Ameri- 
,'can Peace society in 1848, the 
i league of nations and the Bok Peace 
| Plan. Professor Newlin brought out 
■ the interesting fact that some of the 
| ideas and ideals of the early plans 
, are the same as those which are be- 
ing included in the plans of today. 

Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



"BOYS WILL BE BOYS" 

IS EXCELLENT LECTURE 



(Continued from page one) 

other place for them. One of the 
ways that boys are made worse is by 
everyone telling how bad they are. 
And any individual who indulges in 
destructive criticism cannot claim 
any religion. Captain Upton also 
made the statement that the Gossips 
try to keep the eyes of the public 
turned away from themselves. 



BASEBALL GOODS are coming 
in every day. Come in and look 
them over. 

PARKER HARDWARE CO. 



PAIR VARIETY STORE 

Wallace & Son 



We sell everything in Notions 
Come in and look around 



EPFORT BEING MADE TO CLEAR 
UP 'STUDENT FINANCE DEBT 



A few days after the beginning of 
the Loan Fund drive, some of the 
students more directly responsible 
for the care of the student finances, 
became concerned about the debt 
owed by the Student Body on the 
tennis court and other athletic ma- 
terial. 

The matter was taken up by the 
Student Body and thoroughly dis- 
cussed during the chapel hour last 
Tuesday. It was shown that a debt 
of |100 still remained on the tennis 
court, and also on some of the ath- 
letic equipment put in last fall. Af- 
ter some protest by those who feared 
that injecting another issue into the 
middle of the camjaign for the Stu- 
dent Loan fund might result in kill- 
ing the enthusiasm of the students 
for a good cause, it was finally de- 
cided by a unanimous vote to take 
a recess of twenty-four hours and 
clean up the debt if possible. Funds 
for this debt were only solicited 
from students, alumni and board 
members. 

About forty dollars was raised lo- 
cally, and over one hundred letters 
to alumni and old students were 
sent out. It is hoped that sufficient 
funds will be raised from these 
sources and from two plays which 
will soon be given, the proceeds of 
which will go toward eliminating 
the financial obligatioss of the stu- 
dents. If all plans carry, the school 
year will open next fall with a clean 
slate as far as finances are con- 
cerned. 



Black 122 



Office White 22 



DR. H. C. DIXON 
DENTIST 



CITY GROCERY 
Call Black 231 for Fresh Fruits 
and Vegetables and Your 
Grocery Wants 
714 FIRST STREET 

v _y 



Homer Nordyke had something in 
the laboratory the other day that 
looked like a large weenie. But be- 
fore the period was over he proved 
it to be "below knee." 



The shorthand class was talking 
over the chapel talk which Captain 
Upton had given us, when, in a lull 
of the conversation. Miss John- 
son shyly looked down at her desk 
and said: "I didn't know he was 
married." 



It always pays to 
Shoo at the 

PEOPLE'S CASH STORE 

The Moneyback Store 

NEWBERG 



College Students are Always Wel- 
come at 
THE REXALL STORE 
Lynn B. Ferguson 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 



GEO. WARD'S BARBER SHOP 

Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 

NEXT TO YAMHILL ELECTRIC 



FRANK B. LAYMAN 
Attorney-at-Law 

CITY HALL 



STUDENTS— 

For the easiest shave 
and most up-to-date 
hair cut, go to 

JAMES McGUIRE 

OPPOSITE -THE POST OFFICE 



CBEDE'S MARKET 

Our Specialty: 
Our own make of sugar cured 
hams, bacon, and bacon backs, 
lard and all kinds of sausage. 

Quality and Service Counts 



BREAD 

Like your mother makes 
at the 

OLYMPIC BAKERY 



NEWBERG LAUNDRY 

Good Work. Good Service. 

TRY US 



F. E. ROLLINS 
Jeweler 

Fine Watch Repairing 
Pens Straightened 

711 FIRST STREET 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



Oh You Tennis Fans! 

We Have 1924 Balls 



Also Our Baseball Supplies Are 
Now In Stock 



LARKIN PRINCE HARDWARE 
COMPANY 



An Electric Washing Machine 
Makes LABOR DAY a pleasantry 

YAMHILL ELECTRIC CO. 

"IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 



Anderson Motor 
Company 

STAR AND 
STUDEBAKER 

Sales and Service 

Associated Oil Products 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



THE P. A, ASKUS 



VOLUME I 



NUMBER 4 



THE P. A. ASKUS 

Entered in the Crescent as very 
classy matter. 

Published every time by the Cres- 
cent. 

Philip Haworth Editor 

George Poott Assoc. Ed. 

Ret ha Tucker .... Fourth Yr. News 

Rose Ellen Hale Third Yr. News 

Johanna Gerrits. . .Second Yr. News 
Mabel Kendall .... First Yr. News 
Ivor Jones Joke Editor 

Editorial Policy 

1. Get the best news, in the best 
style, and we'll have the best paper. 

2. Boost Pacific Academy. 

3. Back Pacific College. 

Terms: Pay for the Crescent in 
advance and you get the Askus. Buy 
a single copy and you get it anyway. 

SCHOOL SPIRIT 

In the contest between the "Old 
Gold" and "Navy Blue" teams for 
raising money for the Student Loan 
Fund, has been shown the first bit 
of school spirit that has been mani- 
fest at Pacific for a great while. 
The school has plenty of different 
ways to direct and hold this spirit in 
the way of class and literary organ- 
izations. Let us retain, this spirit and 
do something in each of these or- 
ganizations as we have done in the 
loan drive. Such a spirit cannot be 
harmful to the school; it can only 
help build up the organizations, and 
in this way the institution. 

E. E. 



ACADEMY FIVE WINS GAME 

The Academy basketball squad 
defeated the Tualatin high school 
aggregation at that city on Friday 
evening, February 8, by the close 
score of 14 to 10. This score does 
not reflect in the least on the play- 
ing of the Academy boys — they 
passed circles around the Tualatin 
ends just as they did in the game 
on the home floor. The ceiling of 
the Tualatin gym is far too low for 
civilized basketball and consequent- 
ly put a damper on the scoring of 
the Academy team, accustomed as 
they are to a splendid floor. Tual- 
atin was too closely guarded for 
short shots and of course long shots 
were impossible. 

This is the third straight win and 
makes five victories out of six games 
for -the Orange and Blue hoopers. 

The lineup: 
Academy (14) Tualatin (10) 

Huntingtton 4 F 8 Moscher 

Sweet 4 F 2, Wolfe 

Elliott C Johnson 

Everest, 6 G Walizeer 

Chamberlain G Wilcox 
G Blunk 



A FAVORITE GEOMETRY 

P ROPOSIT ION PROVED 

Given: A girl. 

To prove: That she loves me. 

Proof: All the world loves a lov- 
er. She is in the world. I am a 
lover. Therefore, she loves me. Q. 
E. D. 



FOURTH YEAR GOSSIP 

Something was wrong. Many 
members of the Fourth Year class 
were seen industriously rubbing 
their rings and tears were being 
shed by various notables. What was 
the trouble. The Physics class had 
been working with mercury and the 
Fourth Years were endeavoring to 
change their rings back to gold. 



Mrs. Michener — "William, what 
kind of revolution was there during 
this period?" 

William- — "Well, there was a 
kind of revolution in the poultry 
(poetry)." 



The Academy students were as- 
signed new seats in the study hall 
recently. Some absent minded per- 
sons have trouble in returning to i 
their own location. 

Mrs. Michener (reading) — "As 
oft when on my couch I lie, in va- 
cant, or in pensive mood, — -" 
Philip— "That's me." 



Since the advent of Zella Straw 
to the Academy physics class, recita- 
tions have frequently been enlivened 
by arguments as to the relative, mer- 
its of Sherwood and Newberg. We 
should judge from all that has been 
said that Sherwood is an important 
metropolis. 



THIRD YEAR SOPHISTICATION 

A wise remark heard around P. 
A.: "I sit with my feet on the front 
chair in back of me." 

Wanted, information: What is a 
good remedy for a headache received 
from severe pelts on the head? (Ap- 
ply to D. O. C, of the Blue side.) 

English III class is very sorry to 
lose their honored poet and humor- 
ist, William Sweet; also Ruth Kelly 
and Olive Kendall, the class artist 
and star pupil. 

Some of the Third Year boys 
seem severely smitten by the fair 
Tualatin damsels. 

Will someone kindly answer the 
following questions, for we cannot 
find answers in our etiquette book: 

At what angle should the fore- 
arms be placed when the elbows are 
resting on the table? 

What should one do if the gravy 
doesn't match one's vest? 

How should one hold the spoon 
while eating grapefruit to avoid hit- 
ting the hostess in the eye? 

In what position should the hpst 
stand while carving the fowl!' es- 
pecially if it is necessary to put your 
foot on it? 

What is the most graceful manner 
to wield a toothpick? 



Elizabeth Silver of the class of P. 
A. '23, is singing in the Willamette 
Girls Glee club. The club recently 
gave a concert in Newberg. 



Mrs. Michener — "Should poetry 
appeal to your imagination?" 
Floyd — "Not too strong." 

George Foote seems to have a very 
decided dislike for poetry. 



SECOND YEAR WISE CRACKS 

Philip Gatch makes the most 
striking young lady. We hope that 
he gets an opportunity to display 
his talent before the public some 
time in the near future. 

Thelma Rankin is missed by the 
plane geometry class. 

If Lincoln had done all that was 
written about him by the Second 
Years, he never would have lived to 
be president. 

Philip Gatch and Donald Crozer 
attended the basketball gamo in 
Portland last Saturday. On their 
way home they tried to entertain 
the driver with love songs. Our 
deepest sympathies are extended to 
the driver. 



HAVE YOU HEARD THJS'N? 

A new student at a basketball 
game (referee calls a foul) — "But 
where are the feathers " 

Smart friend, — "You goose, don't 
— 'you know? This is a picked 
team." 



Hubby (at breakfast) — "I've got 
a bad head this morning." 

Wifey — "I'm sorry, dear. I do 
hope you will be able to shake it 
off." 



FIRST YEAR DIFFICULTIES 

Mabel Kendall is back in school 
having been out two days. 

We have seen the "Old Gold's" 
grave and all that but we (the Old 
Golds) have not seen any members 
of our team falling into it yet. 
From the looks of the basketball 
game of Tuesday evening the "Navy 
Blues" dug the grave for themselves. 
At least they're making good use of 
it. 

A program was given in the Eng- 
lish I class Tuesday in honor of 
Lincoln's birthday. Two dialogues 
and several stories, written by mem- 
bers of the class, were much en- 
joyed by all. 

Our hearts are filled with sympa- 
thy for the Second Years that are 
not satisfied with their seats so near 
the First Years in the study hall. 



Fred (on the train one morning) 
— "Gee, my hands are cold." 

Gus — "Stick 'em on that 'Heater' 
up there." 



CHARACTERISTICS ESSENTIAL 

TO P. A. STUDENTS 



First Years — Great meekness and 
humble bearing should be evidenced 
at all times, especially in presence 
of Fourth Years. 

Second Yeara — A slight conde- 
scension should be shown to First 
Years and- a feeling of respect for 
Third Years. Fourth Years should be 
gone to for authoritative informa- 
tion on all subjects. 

Third Years should have no char- 
acteristics besides complete non- 
enity. 

Fourth Years — A dignified and 
exalted bearing should be maintain- 
ed to uphold the high position of 
this essentially superior group. 



3. C. PORTER & CO. 
General Merchandise 

Your patronage appreciated 
PHONE BLACK 28 



ELLIOTT TIRE SHOP 

fpr 

TIRES AND TUBES 

Vulcanizing and Repairing 

Umbrellas Repaired 



C. J. BREIER COMPANY 

Everything: in Men's Furnishings 

at Reasonable Prices 
CLOTHING SHOES 



KIENLE & SONS 
PIANOS 
Musical Merchandise 

MUSIC, STATIONERY, ETC. 
504 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



NEWBERG BAKERY 

404 First Street 

Best of Bread; Finest Cakes. 
Pies like Mother nsed to make. 



All Kinds of 
GROCERIES AND CANDY 

— at— 
J. L. VAN BLARICOM'S 
Let us quote you prices 



BOB WALKER 
Shoe Shine Parlor 

Ladies' Suede Shoes a Speciality 

CANDIES AND GUM 

STAGE DEPOT 



Newberg 
Restaurant 

The only one that has 



Waffles 



ROBERT CROUSE, Prop. 



SUPPOSED TO BE FUNNY 

Here's a riddle for you. Emma 
went to the basketball game. She 
couldn't go alone, so how did she get 
there. Answer: Someone went 
with her. 

If the world snarls and shows its 
teeth, speak kindly to it, while you 
look for a brick. 

Girl to boy: "Can't I go with you? 
Oh, how I like you." They walked 



along peaceably for a time, then the 
girl grabbed a pie from him and ran. 
He must have liked her too for he 
started after her. 

To disguise his intentions Ben 
went to Portland. He looked long 
and longingly into a jeweler shop 
window. Then looking cautiously 
around for possible acquaintances, 
and apparently not seeing any, he 
hastily entered the shop. But alas 
for poor Ben! His movements are 



known and he is having a hard 
time trying to pull off a convincing- 
bluff. 



Newberg Graphic 

FINE PRINTING 

OF ALL KINDS 



Come Again and 
Gain Again 



That's what happens when you 
trade here for everything you 
eat and wear. 



Miller Mercantile Co. 



"Good Goods" 



A FORD 

Is what you want. Fords are 
what we have. Come in and take 
your pick. 

NEWBERG MOTOR CO. ' 



DR. JOHN S. RANKIN 
Physician & Surgeon 
Office Phone Black 171 
Residence Phone Gray 171 
Office over U. S. National Bank 

V / 



E. C. BAIRD 
. GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 
Phone Red 37 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



DR. A. M. DAVIS DR. I. R. ROOT 
DENTISTS 

Over Ferguson's Drug Store 
Phone White 38 



VARSITY TEAM LOSES TO 

N. P. DENTAL COLLEGE TEAM 



Pacific's varsity went down to 
defeat at the hands of the tooth-pul- 
lers on Saturday evening, February 
9 at the Aquinas gym in Portland. 
The game was fast and hard fought 
in spite of the one-sided score. Pa- 
cific held them down to a 10 to 6 
score at the end of the first half. 
Woodward was our high point man 
while Rassier led for the Dentists. 
The lineup was as follows: 
P. C. (14) N. P. D. C. (40) 

Rinard, 2 F 14, Rassier 

Woodward, 6 F 2, Duglas 

Lienard, 2 C 7, Rogoway 

Brown, 4 G 6, Web3ter 

Armstrong G 2, Nicholson 

S Ericson 
S 6, Webster 

S 6, Summons 
S 2, Lutz' 

1, Babcock ' 



A. C. SMITH 

Dealer In Leather Goods 
Auto Tops a Speciality 

703 First Street 



CHAPEL NOTES 

On February 5 during the first 
chapel period of the second semester 
President Pennington brought to the 
students of Pacific a realization of 
what the life and accomplishments 
of Wood row Wilson mean to Ameri- 
ca and to the world. First Mr. Pen- 
nington said he wished to make a 
prophecy, and stated that twenty- 
five years from now Woodrow Wil- 
son would be recognized as one of 
the very great among the half dozen 
of America's greatest leaders. He 
then reviewed the important events 
connected with the life of America's 
late war president, making all who 
listened realize how great and yet 
how human was that man whose 
life millions had been watching and 
whose death had so recently been 
announced. 



NEWBERG CYCLE COMPANY 

EARL HUTCHINSON, Prop. 

The Sporting Gocds Store 

Motorcycles, Bicycles, Supplies 
and Repairing 



A LIFE INSURANCE 

With accident Policy — Just what 
a student needs. 

MRS. MINNIE COOPER 
Resident Agent 1254 First St. 
West Coast Life Newberg, Or. 



STUDENTS HOLD GOOD SOCIAL 
MIXER OF GAMES AND STUNTS 



(Continued from page one) 

awarding of the prizes everyone ad- 
journed to room 14 where "hearty" 
ice cream with wafers was served. 
Everyone went home feeling it was 
one of the best socials of the year. 



Will B. Brooks 
Printer 

410 First St. Phone Black 22 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS 
Cleaning Pressing Repairing 

RYGG THE TAILOR 

PHONE BLACK 180 



EVANS 
PLUMBING COMPANY 

311 First Street 



PERSONALS 

We are glad to say that Edna 
Doree is back with us after an ab- 
sence of a year and a half. 

Helen Hester and Elsie Allan took 
a vacation of one evening and made 
a fifty mile drive in a fliver. 

Miss Helen Robertson, accompan- 
ied by her mother, attended the 
Schuman-Heink concert in Portland. 

Florence Lee was in Portland over 
the week end where she gave her 
Italian reading at the Rose City 
Park church. 

Captain T. Dinsmore Upton who 
lectured Thursday evening, was a 
guest at the Junior-Senior reception 
at President Pennington's home 
Thursday evening. 

The familiar faces of Laurence 
and Alice Crozer are seen among us 
once more. They returned only re- 
cently with their father, F. E. Cro- 
zer, from California. 

Howard Nottage, Virgil Hinshaw, 
Eva Miles, Lucille Clough and Helen 
Hester, all of the Senior class, at- 
tended the Saturday afternoon mat- 
inee of the "Merchant of Venice" 
playing in Portland last week. 



ECONOMY CLEANERS 
AND DYERS 

ELGIN VAN BLARICOM 



Bright One — "Why does a smile 
creep across a girl's face?" 

Dull One — "Ask me not why it 
is." 

Bright One — "Why if it should 
run across, it would kick up too 
much dust." 

Said the Sophy to the Senior: 
"I do wish I weren't so green, 
'Cause I'm just as bad as a Junior, 
So I must be really quite green." 



COLLEGE PHARMACY 

E. W. Hodson, Reg. Pharmacist 

Prescriptions a Specialty 
Photo Supplies, Printing and De- 
veloping. Daily service. 
900 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



PARLOR PHARMACY 

School Supplies and 
Stationery 

H. A. Cooley, Proprietor 



C. A. MORRIS 
OPTICIAN 
JEWELER 



CLARENCE BUTT 
Attorney 

Office second floor Union Block 



CAMPBELL'S 

CANDIES 

The Best 



ALWAYS 



W. H. BEST 

W. W. HOWETT 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

WATER METERS 



DR. THOS. W. HESTER 

Physician and Surgeon 

Office in Dixon Building 
NEWBERG, -:- OREGON 



CITY MEAT MARKET 
"The Home of Good Meats" 

Deliver before and after school 
Phone Red «6 
MOORE & SON 



W. W. HOLLINGSWORTH CO. 

STORE OF QUALITY 



500 First St. 



Newberg, Ore. 



Sherlock's Restaurant 

BIG EATS FOR 
LITTLE MONEY 



Yours for Service and Quality 

ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

JASPER BALES, Proprietor 



Watches Jewelry Clocks 
E. G. RED) 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
All Work Guaranteed 
906 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Newherg, Oregon 
KEEP YOUR RESERVE FUNDS WITH US 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 



Ralph W. VanValin 



DENTISTRY 
X-Ray Diagnosis 



OVER U. S. BANK 



GAS ADMINISTERED 



UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK 
Capital, Surplus and Profits $125,000 

Accounts of students, faculty and friends of Pacific College invited 
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ESTBLISHED 1889 



Graham's Drug Store 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES KODAK FINISHING 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PERIODICALS 



_j 



"Rosebud Flour " 



MONEY BACK IF NOT SATISFACTORY